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Colourfree Baby Drops 1-2 Months

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Colourfree Suspension 1-5 Years

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Chewable Tablets 3+

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Suppositories 6 Months - 5 Years

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Colourfree Suspension 5-12 Years

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Elixir 5 - 12 Years

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Suppositories 5-12 Years

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Soluble 7+

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Panadol Tablets

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Panadol Caplets with Optizorb Formulation

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Panadol Tablets with Optizorb Formulation

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Panado Rapid Handipak

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Panadol Osteo

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Panadol Cold & Flu + Decongestant

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Panadol Cold & Flu MAX Hot Lemon

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Panadol Colour-Free Baby Drops 1-2 Years

Colourfree Baby Drops 1 Month - 1 Year

  • Concentrated Drops
  • 1 Month - 1 Years
  • Gentle on Tiny Tummies
  • 500mg Paracetamol
    No gluten, lactose or sugar
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panadol colour-free suspension 5-12 years

Colourfree Suspension 1-5 Years

  • Suspension
  • 1-5 Years
  • Strawberry/Orange Flavour
  • Active Ingredient: Paracetamol 24 mg/mL
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Panadol Chewable Tablets

Chewable Tablets 3+

  • Dissolvable Tablets
  • 1-5 Years
  • Perfect For Travel
  • Active Ingredient: 120mg of Paracetamol per tablet
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Panadol Suppositories 6months-5years

Suppositories 6 Months - 5 Years

  • Suppositories
  • 6 Months - 5 Years
  • For vomiting
  • Active ingredient: Paracetamol 125mg per suppository.
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panadol colour-free suspension 1-5 years

Colourfree Suspension 5-12 Years

  • Suspension
  • 5-12 Years
  • Strawberry/Orange Flavour
  • Active ingredient: Paracetamol 48 mg/mL
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Panadol Elixir 5-12 Years

Elixir 5 - 12 Years

  • Suspension
  • 5-12 Years
  • Fast & gentle relief
  • Active ingredient: Paracetamol 48 mg/mL
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Panadol Suppositories 5-12 Years

Suppositories 5-12 Years

  • Suppositories
  • 5-12 Years
  • For vomiting
  • Active ingredient: 250mg Paracetamol per suppository
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Panadol Soluble 7+

Soluble 7+

  • Effervescent Tablets
  • 7+ Years
  • Absorbed quicker
  • Active ingredient: Paracetamol
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Panadol Tablets

Panadol Tablets

  • Tablets
  • 12+ Years
  • Basic Pain
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
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Panadol Caplets With Optizorb Formulation

Panadol Caplets with Optizorb Formulation

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • Quicker Absorbtion
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
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Panadol Tablets With Optizorb Formulation

Panadol Tablets with Optizorb Formulation

  • Tablets
  • 12+ Years
  • Quicker Absorbtion
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
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Panadol Mini Caps

Panadol Mini Caps

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • Easier to swallow
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
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Panadol Suppositories

Panadol Suppositories

  • Suppositories
  • 12+ Years
  • For vomiting
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol per suppository.
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Panadol Extra

Panadol Extra Caplets

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • Fight Tough Pai
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol , 65mg caffeine
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Panadol Rapid Handipak

Panadol Rapid Soluble

  • Dissolvable Tablets
  • 12+ Years
  • Absorbed 2x Faster
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
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Panadol Rapid Caplets

Panadol Rapid Caplets

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • Absorbed 2x Faster
  • Active ingredient: Paracetamol
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Panadol Rapid Handipak

Panado Rapid Handipak

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • Absorbed 2x Faster
  • Active ingredient: 500mg Paracetamol
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Panadol Osteo

Panadol Osteo

  • Tablets
  • 12+ Years
  • Up to 8 hours
  • Active ingredient: 665mg Paracetamol
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Panadol Cold & Flu + Decongestant

Panadol Cold & Flu + Decongestant

  • Caplets
  • 12+ Years
  • With Decongestant
  • 500mg Paracetamol
Kids Immunisation Guide

Kids Immunisation Guide

Immunisation is an essential part of keeping your child healthy while their immune system is still developing, by protecting them against serious diseases.i, ii And when you get your child immunised, you’re not just protecting them, but also the wider community. The higher the number of people vaccinated against a certain disease, the harder it is for that disease to spread.i

If you are in doubt about when your baby’s next immunisation is due or which vaccinations they need, just ask your doctor.i

What is Immunisation for Kids?

Immunisations – also known as vaccines – work by teaching our immune system how to fight diseases. They introduce a weakened version of a germ that causes a certain disease into the body. The body can then ‘practice’ fighting against this germ by creating antibodies (proteins in the blood that combat harmful bacteria).i If an immunised child comes into contact with that disease later in life, their antibodies are already in place. This means the body knows how to combat the disease and will prevent them from getting sick.ii

Getting your child immunised also helps to eradicate dangerous diseases by stopping their spread. Vaccines prevent two to three million deaths worldwide each year and have helped to wipe out, or drastically reduce, the prevalence of serious diseases such as smallpox, polio and the measles.ii, v

What Diseases Can Kids’ Immunisation Protect Against?

Immunisation protects against many serious childhood diseases. Various immunisations are free for children aged four years or under.i You can discover which vaccines are free of charge by taking a look the National Immunisation Program’s Schedule, which is updated regularly with the latest information.

What is the National Immunisation Program (NIP)?

The National Immunisation Program provides free immunisations for all babies and children in Australia, with certain vaccines recommended at different ages. These give your child crucial protection against many serious childhood diseases.i, vi

The National Immunisation Program (NIP) has a recommended schedule of what vaccines should be given, and when. The NIP schedule is updated regularly. For the latest information on immunisation facts for kids, visit the Department of Health’s National Immunisation Program Schedule

What Vaccinations Should My Child Have and When?

For the best protection against diseases, immunisations need to be given at the right time. The first is scheduled just after birth and then at regular intervals – two months (although it can be given as early as six weeks), four months, six months, 12 months, 18 months and four years. There are also programs in place for school-age children and teenagers.vii

Who Can Get Free Flu Vaccines?

Children aged six months and older are entitled to free flu (influenza) vaccines if they have certain medical risk factors.i Check to see if your child is eligible for a free flu vaccination by viewing the National Immunisation Program Schedule – or speak to your doctor.

What Are the Side Effects of Kids’ Immunisation?

Most of the side effects associated with vaccination are not severe and clear up within a few days. If you are concerned about potential side effects, discuss the benefits and risks of immunisation with a healthcare professional.

The most common side effects of immunisation will only effect one to 10 percent of vaccinated people. They include:viii

  • Fever (temperature of above 38.5°C)
  • Soreness, redness or swelling at the injection site
  • Tiredness
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting, diarrhoea and muscle pain (occur less often)

Ensure you give your child extra fluids to drink after immunisation and do not overdress them if they are feeling hot or feverish.ix If you are concerned about the possible side effects of immunisation, such as pain and fever, it is advisable to speak to your doctor or pharmacist.

Severe reactions to immunisations are very rare.viii If, however, your child experiences any symptoms that cause concern, contact your doctor or call 13 HEALTH (13 43 25 84) for 24/7 advice.

Common Childhood Illnesses

While immunisation helps protect against serious childhood illnesses, a child feeling unwell can be a worry. For many common fever-inducing conditions, Panadol is available in a range of children's medicines to help reduce the discomfort associated with fever.x, xi

SOURCES

Clicking any of the links below takes you to an external website that is independently operated and not managed by GSK. GSK assumes no responsibility for the content on the website. If you do not wish to leave this website, do not click on the links below.

i.Immunisation for children. Australian Government Department of Health. https://www.health.gov.au/health-topics/immunisation/immunisation-throughout-life/immunisation-for-children. Accessed 21/02/20. 

ii.Why get immunised? Australian Government Department of Health. https://campaigns.health.gov.au/immunisationfacts/why-get-immunised. Accessed 21/02/20. 

iii.Antibody. Cambridge Dictionary. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/antibody. Accessed 21/02/20.

iv.Common Questions About Immunizations. Kids Health. https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/fact-myth-immunizations.html. Accessed 21/02/20.

v.Immunization. World Health Organisation. https://www.who.int/news-room/facts-in-pictures/detail/immunization. Accessed 21/02/20. 

vi.National Immunisation Program Schedule. Australian Government Department of Health. https://www.health.gov.au/health-topics/immunisation/immunisation-throughout-life/national-immunisation-program-schedule. Accessed 21/02/20. 

vii.NIP Schedule – April 2019. Australian Government Department of Health. https://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/national-immunisation-program-schedule-landscape-national-immunisation-program-childhood-schedule-changes-schedule-card-landscape_0.pdf. Accessed 21/02/20. 

viii.Vaccines and immunisation. NPS Medicinewise. https://www.nps.org.au/consumers/vaccines-and-immunisation#vaccine-side-effects-and-safety. Accessed 21/02/20. 

ix.Fever in children. Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne. https://www.rch.org.au/kidsinfo/fact_sheets/Fever_in_children/. Accessed 21/02/20. 

x.Roseola infantum. Health Direct. https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/roseola-infantum. Accessed 28/02/20. 

xi.Paracetamol for children. NHS. https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/paracetamol-for-children/ . Accessed 28/02/20.